[ General ] 13 June, 2013 13:18

Why the Brown Recluse Spider is difficult to eradicate

There are several reasons why the brown recluse spider is so difficult to eradicate:

1.    Unlike insects, spiders do not clean themselves. Thus they do not typically ingest residual traces of insecticide just by crawling across the floor.
 
2.    Brown recluses, unlike other spiders, don’t ingest insecticide that might be sprayed on a prey-catching web. This is because they do not spin webs to catch prey and rarely use their silk.
 
3.    Female brown recluses often live inside walls, boxes, or other out of the way places where pest control companies do not spray.

4.    Male brown recluses typically hide out during the day when pest control companies do their spraying.
 
5.    Unlike most spiders, brown recluses prefer dead prey over living prey. For this reason, when pesticides kill insects it only makes their lives even easier because they don’t have to kill anything to have a meal. Less energy is spent and they can go longer in between meals as well.

In fact, brown recluse spiders can eat an insect killed by insecticide just 24 hours prior. They will even feed on insects that have been dead for up to two months!
 
6.    Research conducted at Oklahoma State and Texas A&M Universities confirm that brown recluse spiders are tenacious and are not killed by most insecticides, unless sprayed directly on the spider. However, even a spray of water can kill a brown recluse.
 
7.    When pesticides are used, the more mobile male brown recluses simply flee the house en masse, as has been proven by researchers at Kansas University who set pitfall traps outside entry/exit points of homes that were being treated. Probably others were going to their favorite hiding place if they weren’t hiding there already.

8.    House spiders that are tremendously beneficial in the battle against brown recluse spiders can be killed by the pesticide, eliminating both competition for insects and potential enemies.

So the bottom line is you cannot necessarily completely eradicate the spider with 100 percent certainty. The only thing you can do is hope to contain them… especially in areas where they are indigenous.

Brown recluses live both inside and outside of the home. If you were to eliminate them all in one day, there could be more who are outside who find their way in.
Nevertheless, Kansas University researchers do make the statement that “effective population management is possible” with glue traps.

Pesticides are often ineffective with Brown Recluse spiders, and for this reason reputable pest control companies do not guarantee eradication of the spiders. Kansas University researchers state that spider traps, if used correctly, are effective for controlling Brown Recluse populations. We offer the brand used and recommended by them. See http://www.brown-recluse.com/spidertraps.html for more details.

Thomas J. Martincic
Brown Recluse Response Team
www.Brown-Recluse.com 
Progeny

 

[ General ] 16 August, 2012 18:13

Drought causing higher Brown Recluse Infestations

The drought that our nation is suffering this summer is causing higher than normal Brown Recluse infestations in homes. Due to the lack of rain, Brown Recluse spiders are finding sources of water inside homes, such as around a condensating toilet or around the A/C & Hot Water heater.

The video can be watched here.

You'll notice in the video the high number of spiders that were caught by spider traps. The furnace and hot water heater are popular areas for Brown Recluses to visit because not only do Brown Recluses get a drink of water from condensation, but so do household insects.

As was mentioned by the doctor in the video, Brown Recluse bites are most dangerous to those with compromised immune systems. The elderly and children 7 and under are also at highest risk. Young children are at higher risk due to their lower body weight. This results in a higher percentage of venom being injected in the body.  

Pesticides are often ineffective with Brown Recluse spiders, and for this reason reputable pest control companies do not guarantee eradication of the spiders. Kansas University researchers state that spider traps, if used correctly, are effective for controlling Brown Recluse populations. We offer the brand used and recommended by them. See http://www.brown-recluse.com/spidertraps.html for more details.

Thomas J. Martincic
Brown Recluse Response Team
www.Brown-Recluse.com 
Progeny

 

[ General ] 04 December, 2009 10:40

Brown Recluse First Aid Kit in the News

Channel 5 out of Memphis, Tennessee (WMCTV) recently did an investigative report on the Brown Recluse spider and included some of the video found on this website.

During the last segment of their investigation, they interviewed a fireman who was bitten by the Brown Recluse Spider and suffered a severe reaction. The fireman now keeps a Brown Recluse First Aid Kit on hand as a precaution in case he is bitten again. 

Because of the name "Brown Recluse First Aid Kit," some who come to our web site might be under the impression that our kit is only going to be effective when immediately applying to a bite wound.

But as our customer testimonials continually demonstrate, the Brown Recluse First Aid Kit is very effective on old bite wounds as well. Our customers have even reported success on festering bite wounds that are months old.

Remarkably, bite wounds can recur on a yearly basis or irregularly reappear even after they appear to be fully healed. It is believed that this is due to the venom still being trapped inside the skin. Our kit has been used on these kinds of flare-ups and is reported to work very well.

Since the First Aid Kit does a great job of adsorbing the venom, the math is simple: No venom = no continuing tissue damage. Without the presence of venom, the body simply heals itself.

Click here to watch the video, courtesy of wmctv.com.

Thomas J. Martincic
Brown Recluse Response Team
www.Brown-Recluse.com 
Progeny

 

[ General ] 22 July, 2008 10:09

Brown Recluse in my Home State?

One of the most common questions we receive are questions about whether the Brown Recluse Spider is found in a particular locale. Unlike other kinds of living things which are harmed by man's development and expansion, Brown Recluse spiders benefit from man's increased population and development because houses and other buildings are an ideal environment for the spider. Therefore, their population is only going to increase every year.

Due to the mobility of society and this spider's tendency to "recluse" themselves in boxes and shipping cartons, the spider can be found nearly anywhere. However, it is most commonly found in the states of Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Kansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Arkansas, Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia, Virginia, Texas, Alabama, Mississippi, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Louisiana.

Brown Recluse spiders are most abundant in Texas, Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma and Arkansas. One study showed that 70% of homes
in Missouri have the Brown Recluse spider.

One thing that is not commonly realized is that there are other Recluse species of spiders which are considered dangerous but are found in other states. Among them are the Desert Recluse and Arizona Recluse (both found in the southwestern United States). The Mediterranean Recluse is found in most states and Chilean Recluse spiders (the most dangerous of all) are sometimes found in large cities due to commerce and trade. Other spiders which can cause a necrotic wound are the Hobo spider (found in the the Pacific Northwest and Canada) and the Yellow Sac Spider (found in all 50 states). See http://www.brown-recluse.com/spiderinfo.html for a map.

Necrotic spider bite wounds from the Recluse and other species have occured in all 50 states. Our Brown Recluse First Aid Kit has a Lifetime Money Back Guarantee which will give you a full refund if you find it ineffective on any necrotic bite wound, regardless of the spider species. We are so confident, we'll even pay the shipping fees to return the kit. But in spite of the fact that 40% of those who purchase a kit report that they are suffering from a bite wound, in the last 4 years our return rate for ineffectiveness is only .001 !

Thomas J. Martincic
Brown Recluse Response Team
www.Brown-Recluse.com 
Progeny

 

[ General ] 22 June, 2008 06:30

Brown Recluse Spider Trap in Action

We recently added a video to this web site showing the incredible effectiveness of our Catchmaster Glue traps.

At a residence we placed a Brown Recluse Spider in front of one of our traps for the purposes of proving how effective these traps are at catching Brown Recluses.

We couldn't have asked for a better example.

The Brown Recluse Spider took off running and inadvertantly allowed one of his legs to enter the trap. Running at nearly full speed, the Brown Recluse Spider was literally stopped in his tracks.

We then picked up the trap slowly and allowed the spider to try and pull his leg away. He could not.

We allowed him to dangle there for a little while and even shook the trap back and forth as he was dangling there from one leg, but the powerful glue in our traps held onto his leg and would not let go.

We now have bondafide proof of what our customers have been saying for over 4 years now--these traps catch Brown Recluses and do not let go!

A customer in St. Louis, Missouri recently re-ordered 36 of our traps after having caught 60 Brown Recluse Spiders in his home. Catches of 60-100 Brown Recluse Spiders are not that uncommon. If you have one, it is almost a guarantee that there are a whole lot more due to the spider's aggressive breeding. 

To see the video, visit the traps information page at:

http://www.brown-recluse.com/traps.html

Thomas J. Martincic
Brown Recluse Response Team
www.Brown-Recluse.com 
Progeny

 

[ General ] 01 June, 2008 06:51

Pesticides for Brown Recluse Spiders

Many are under the impression that if they call a Pest Control company, they will come out and eliminate the Brown Recluse spider from their home. But almost no pest control company will guarantee they can eliminate the spider. Any company that does guarantee eradication of this spider is probably not telling the truth. 

The tenacity and mobility of Brown Recluse Spiders make them notoriously difficult to eradicate. Unlike insects, they do not clean themselves and are less likely to ingest any pesticide residue. And unlike other spiders, they don't spin webs to catch prey so that pesticide residue collects on the web which is later ingested. 

If insecticides are used, studies show that they tend to flee the home "en masse" when insecticides are being applied. And since they can safely eat insects that were killed by insecticides a mere 24 hours prior, and they actually prefer to eat dead insects over living ones (81% of the time in one study), applying insecticides may only add to their choices for food rather than helping to get rid of the spider. 

Spraying the pesticide directly on the spider will probably kill it, but so will stomping the spider with your shoe or spraying it with water. If you choose to use pesticides anyway, first apply the pesticide all around the outside of the house, then apply it behind the baseboards before doing the rest of the house. Getting inside the walls and behind the baseboards are essential. Female Brown Recluses rarely roam far from their hiding places inside walls and boxes. They will keep reproducing as long as there are some mobile male spiders available in the home.

For this reason, Pest Control companies typically use glue traps to help eradicate the spider. The glue traps (sticky traps) offered on this web site are the same brand used by thousands of Pest Control companies throughout the United States. However, even many Pest Control technicians don't know the best places to put the traps. We include an information sheet on all the best places to put the traps based on recommendations by Kansas University researchers. Click here for more information on traps.

Thomas J. Martincic
Brown Recluse Response Team
www.Brown-Recluse.com 
Progeny

 

[ General ] 13 May, 2008 13:08

Brown Recluse Spider Fangs

Brown Recluse Spider Fangs

This rather intimidating looking photo, taken by Kansas University researchers, is actually a picture of a Brown Recluse spider attempting to bite a regular no. 10 staple. Notice that the fangs aren't even as long as the staple is thick. The fangs are smaller than a sewing needle and the edge of a dime. They are too short to bite through regular clothes so they typically need bare skin in order to successfully bite you.

Interestingly, their experiments demonstrated that the Brown Recluse wouldn't try to bite if something touched its legs, its underside or anywhere on its body unless there was pressure. Pressure meaning they feel like they are getting squashed by something such as getting caught inside clothes, shoes, or rolling over a Brown Recluse spider who happens to be crawling on your bed at night. Almost all Brown Recluse bites are from incidental contact like this rather than aggression.

Thomas J. Martincic
Brown Recluse Response Team
www.Brown-Recluse.com 
Progeny

 

[ General ] 08 May, 2008 07:21

Preventing Brown Recluse bites during the day
Brown Recluses are non-aggressive spiders that typically hide out during the day. Since nearly most all bites occur through accidental contact, where they choose to hide out can affect whether or not you are bitten by the spider.

A good way to avoid being bitten is to "think like the spider". Ask yourself, "Am I putting my hands in an area where a Brown Recluse spider might like to hide out during the day?" If it's an normally undisturbed area such as a box, a closet, a storage area, inside rarely used shoes, in a garage/barn/shed or in a woodpile the answer is probably yes. Wear gloves and long sleeved shirts if you are going to be working in one of these areas.

Many bites occur when putting on clothing that was either on the floor or inside a dresser drawer. If you live in a home that has a population of Brown Recluse spiders, always thoroughly shake out and inspect your clothes before putting them on.

They will bite because of the pressure exerted between the clothing and the skin. If you feel a spider inside your clothes, do not panic. Just carefully remove the clothing and be sure not to put any 'pinch pressure' on the spider. Also shake our your shoes before putting them on to avoid getting bit on your feet.

Also be sure to check your bed before getting into it, especially if it has been unused for a long time. Of course, the best way to avoid Brown Recluse bites is to eliminate the spider from your home. See http://www.brown-recluse.com/ for more information.

Thomas J. Martincic
Brown Recluse Response Team
www.Brown-Recluse.com 
Progeny

[ General ] 16 March, 2008 22:09
Preventing Brown Recluse bites at night

Brown Recluse spiders are non-aggressive and prefer to hide and run rather than attack humans. Most bites occur accidentally when rolling over in bed, gathering wood, putting on clothing or shoes, emptying out boxes, cleaning out closets and other undisturbed areas and when taking a bath or shower.

Brown Recluses cannot negotiate the smooth surfaces of sinks, bathtubs and shower surfaces. This is because have pinchers at the end of their feet to grab things as they walk. If there is nothing to grab onto, they have no way to move.

This is helpful knowledge in preventing Brown Recluse bites. They cannot climb up the smooth surface of the feet of most bed framing. However, if you have ruffles on your bed or if the bedding material is in any way touching the floor during the day or at night, they can easily climb up and you are more likely to suffer a bite when rolling over at night.

It is also very important that you keep the bed away from the wall. They can climb some walls if there is a rough enough surface area to them. Then they could get on your bed via the wall and crawl into your bedcovers. Bites occur when people move around in their bed at night and accidentally crush the spider.

Another consideration is that Brown Recluses tend to like certain kinds of ceiling light fixtures. They can crawl inside the fixture through the attic/ceiling, escape the fixture and then drop down below.

If your light fixture is directly above your bed, this is another possible way they could enter your bedding area. You can check your light fixture to see if any Brown Recluse spiders may have gotten caught inside the bulb cover. If so, that's a sure sign that they are entering in this way. You can also try to seal the area around the light fixture if possible.

Thomas J. Martincic
Brown Recluse Response Team
www.Brown-Recluse.com 
Progeny